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5.11 All Hazards Prime - medic backpack

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by photog, Oct 31, 2016.

  1. photog

    photog Empty Pockets

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    Hi,

    once again, sorry for the picture-heavy post, but I've understood that people like to watch pictures here. :) And try to bear with my language. I'm not a native English speaker.

    I'd like to show a few pictures of my work-related 5.11 All Hazards Prime backpack that I use to carrying some of the medical equipment when doing certain types of jobs.

    This kit does not include even nearly everything, but enought to (try) to keep the patient alive and maintain ABC's. And also to take care of minor everyday-type accidents.

    Let me know if you'd like to see additional pictures about the contents of the interior pouches.


    So, here is the backpack in all of it's glory.

    [​IMG]

    The backpack features two big main compartments, a smaller exterior compartment, a very small compartment next to the top handle and hydration compartment in the back.



    [​IMG]
    Small compartment in the front of the backpack. This is where I keep most of the examination tools, including automated BP cuff, stethoscope, aural body tempeature meter, b-Gluck meter, pen light etc and a small pouch (to be changed into a PAX model like the other pouches seen here) with small instruments like scissors, forceps, small surgical instruments etc.



    [​IMG]
    Above we can see the anterior main copmartment opened. Contents from the top downwards can better be seen in the following pictures.



    [​IMG]

    - a tear-out pouch for airway (A) equipment: (laryngoscope + blades, number 10 scalpell, ET tubes, 10ml syringe, 2 x ARS needle, small suction kit, Xylocaine, adult and pediatric Magill forceps etc.
    - a tear-out pouch for IV equipment: 500ml RAC, cannulas, 3-way valve, tubing, tourniquet etc.



    [​IMG]

    From left to right:
    - a blue PELI 1060 micro case for emergency drugs (ASA, Dinit, Epipen etc), syringes, needles and NaCl 0,9%.
    - a black pouch including a combined SpO2 & ECG device (Heal Force Prince 180D with SpO2 add-on).
    - a (red) pouch for breathing (B): bag-valve mask, set of OPA's, oxygen tubing.
    - 50g bottle of CarboMix for drug overdoses.



    [​IMG]

    This is the very small compartment in the top of the backpack, next to the top handle. I keep all my spare nitrile gloves and a headlamp in there for easy access.



    [​IMG]

    Above we can see the posterior main compartment opened. I keep a few HALO chest seals in the top sleeve. See closeup pictures of the compartment below.



    [​IMG]

    I like to keep all my equipment organized in smaller colour-coded and name-tagged pouches. I prefer the German brand called PAX. Pouches in this compartment from top left:
    - a green pouch for injuries: cold packs, cold gel, gauze, stretching bandages, mitella etc.
    - a yellow pouch for minor wounds: tape, Steri-Strip, desinfectant, gauze, antibiotic ointment, bandages, plasters, sterile gauze swabs and dressings, cloth scissors etc.
    - a red pouch for uncontrolled bleeding: CAT tourniquet, Quicklot, bandage, emergency dressing, a few pairs of nitrile gloves. (The idea is that in the event of an uncontrolled bleeding, I only need to open this pouch and I've got everything needed to control the bleeding.)
    - an orange pouch for burns: BurnAid gel and dressings, sterile gauze swabs and dressings, sterile water etc.
    - an aluminium container for a small selection of P.O. medication. (Ibuprofen, paracetamol, ebastine, loperamide, ASA, cortisone etc.)



    [​IMG]

    In the bottom of the posterior main compartment this backpack features a handy sleeve, where I keep SAM splints, large sterile dressings, extra ECG connectors and some other large-sized items.



    [​IMG]

    And finally, this is the hydration compartment where I keep a few sturdy emergency blankets that can also be used for lifting, moving and carrying (for short distances) the patient.

    I guess that's about it for this customized back pack. IV drugs are added as needed. A typical set includes, adrenaline, amiodarone, adesonine, fentanyl, morphine, midazolam, naloxone, flumazenile, TXA and a few other drugs.



    On some trips I also carry a separate medications kit, manufactured by StatPacks:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This small bag is actually very handy and meds can be kept neatly organized while also easily accessible. Typically I carry a selection of antibiotics, painkillers, relaxants, medicine for stomach etc.


    Feel free to comment or ask anything! I hope you enjoyed the pictures. In overall I think that the 5.11 All Hazards Prime is a great backpack for this kind of use. Not too big but big enough for everything essential.
     
    Last edited by photog, Nov 2, 2016
    AlleyKat, gazz98, chaosmagnet and 2 others like this.
  2. maillet282

    maillet282 Loaded Pockets

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    Nice set up. I now need to look at a different bag for my owne med bag set up.
     
  3. toddbe

    toddbe Empty Pockets

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    Where do you buy the Pax brand pouches?
     
  4. photog

    photog Empty Pockets

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    I have bought them from a local medical supply store. I think they also import the brand to my country.

    To my knowledge it should also be possible to buy PAX products directly on the manufacturers website.

    http://www.pax-bags.com
     
  5. Telstar

    Telstar Loaded Pockets

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    Why have a large MEDIC identifier on your backpack?
     
  6. photog

    photog Empty Pockets

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    Why not? Me and my colleagues don't work in a military, law enforcement or any other "tactical" environment, quite the opposite. "MEDIC" is a widely locally and internationally recognized text / word. We could've also used a red cross, but local and actually also international laws limit the use of red cross on white background.
     
  7. thekapow

    thekapow EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    I love your set-up, You are really pushing me towards the hazards prime! may I ask what your background is out of curiosity? First I was thinking paramedic based on the IV drug list, but then i noticed that you carry metronidazol and amoxicillin, both perscription drugs not normally used in a prehospital EMS setting so now im thinking MD, or maybe rual/offshore medic? I see you carry endotracheal tubes but is it correct that you dont carry Npa's (they would be my first and only choice in a personal kit)? I really like your use of the PAX pockets in a none medic bag.
    Constructive criticism: I personally think your CAT is behind too many zippers, If it was my kit It would go on the outside (and be a pair of 2 CAT's).
     
  8. photog

    photog Empty Pockets

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    Thank you very much for your feedback! I'm a paramedic, RN and in a few months I'm done with my BSc in emergency medicine. For most of the drugs we have standing orders / protocols and for the rest we consult our medical control / doctor in charge. Antibiotics (and many other per os drugs seen in the red pouch) are typically only for situations where we are far enough away from medical facilities and need to start the antibiotics or other medication immdeaditely. Typical conditions would be bacterial infections and inflammations (teeth, wounds, GI problems, appendicitis, UTI etc.), severe back or neck pain (muscle relaxants), insomnia, anxiety etc.

    There is a set of six OPA's (not NPA's) included in the red "B" pouch, next to the bag-valve mask. ET tubes are only for resuscitation or emergency cricothyrotomy.

    That is actually a very good point regarding CAT placement. Maybe I should put one in the small compartment in the front of the backpack.
     
    Last edited by photog, Nov 3, 2016
  9. Swe_Nurse

    Swe_Nurse Loaded Pockets

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    Very nice looking setup! I agree with thekapow that tourniquets should be placed in a more convenient location. I would also add a couple of SWAT-T tourniquets, first because you can never have enough tourniquets and secondly because they are quite versatile. Are you carrying glucagon? What kind of documentation do you use?

    The All Hazards Prime looks great in this setup, I might have to get one to replace my old Camelbak bag. Another question; Which BP cuff are you using? Never been a fan of automated ones but they certainly have a few perks so I'm interested in getting a fairly compact one.
     
  10. Telstar

    Telstar Loaded Pockets

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    If you are a medic, you and your colleagues already know that. Identifier plates are generally directed at other people. I was wondering why you need to do that?
     
  11. gazz98

    gazz98 Loaded Pockets

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    Very nice setup! I don't recognize all the items but it seems very complete. Thanks for sharing.
     
  12. photog

    photog Empty Pockets

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    (Sorry, I edited your questios for clarity..)

    - Yes, 1-2 more CAT:s could be a good iea. Lukicly massive traumatic bleedings and gunshot wound are a very rare occassion, but you never know... And they're so cheap... so, why not.

    - We have a mobile database that can be used either with an iPad (in a rugged case) or a rugged laptop (Panasonic CF...). For backup we've got our government issued SV210 paper verisons.

    - I prefer to use the automatic one (seen in the second picture with a green NIBP label), but I do have a regular manual aneroid cuff as well. When we've got our Zoll X or LP15 with us, we mostly use their NIBP and other measurement options for conveniency.

    Well, the patches are velcro labeled so there is no prolem in removing them should the situation need that. We also tend to have 10-20 less than more similar black backpacks, so it's easier to identify the correct bag... Not to mention trying to explain a customs official at some country border very far away from us (and our western way of operating) what we use this bag and its contents for and why we really need to bring it with us to their country...
     
  13. photog

    photog Empty Pockets

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    (Sorry, I edited your questios for clarity..)

    - Yes, 1-2 more CAT:s could be a good iea. Lukicly massive traumatic bleedings and gunshot wound are a very rare occassion, but you never know... And they're so cheap... so, why not.

    - We have a mobile database that can be used either with an iPad (in a rugged case) or a rugged laptop (Panasonic CF...). For backup we've got our government issued SV210 paper verisons.

    - I prefer to use the automatic one (seen in the second picture with a green NIBP label), but I do have a regular manual aneroid cuff as well. When we've got our Zoll X or LP15 with us, we mostly use their NIBP and other measurement options for conveniency.

    Well, the patches are velcro labeled so there is no prolem in removing them should the situation need that. We also tend to have 10-20 less than more similar black backpacks, so it's easier to identify the correct bag... Not to mention trying to explain a customs official at some country border very far away from us (and our western way of operating) what we use this bag and its contents for and why we really need to bring it with us to their country...