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Coarse Diamond, followed by Soft Arkansas gives good results.

Discussion in 'Sharpening Stuff -- Stones, Strops, and Systems' started by Sharp Knife, Jun 21, 2016.

  1. Sharp Knife

    Sharp Knife Loaded Pockets

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    Simple, pretty fast, and gives good results. This is what I am doing now.
     
  2. Sharp Knife

    Sharp Knife Loaded Pockets

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    Sometimes I will use Coarse Silicon Carbide, then Coarse Aluminum Oxide, and then Soft Arkansas; but Coarse Diamond, followed by Soft Arkansas gets me there more quickly.
     
  3. Sharp Knife

    Sharp Knife Loaded Pockets

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    I started stopping after Soft Arkansas, because it seemed that with a lot of the cheap stainless steels, you lose all of the toothiness of the edge if you go all the way to Black Arkansas or Translucent Arkansas, or to Belgian Blue Waterstone.

    However, today I intend to pick up a standard Hard Arkansas and give that a try, as a new stopping point.
    I want to give Coarse Diamond, Soft Arkansas, Hard Arkansas a try now.
     
    BadDad likes this.
  4. BadDad

    BadDad Empty Pockets

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    I like an ultra fine diamond to soft Ark progression on new knives to remove factory grind marks. If the edge has chips or bevel issues, I go to medium diamond or coarse silicone carbide.

    Anything harder than the hard Arkansas isn't going to make you're edge much sharper. You're just polishing and refining after that, in my experience. Once you get to a hard Arkansas, you're getting pretty close to the 1500-2k grit range, relatively speaking. Spend more time on it, and you can get a really nice, sharp, well-polished edge off the hard Ark. You should be able to shave arm hair off it...

    I do use a true hard for my "finer" knives that I don't use really aggressively. I use a true hard or a white translucent for finishing straight razors for shaving my head. The more refined your edge, the easier it is to damage and dull.