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Spyderco pacific salt and endura side by side review

Discussion in 'Knives' started by Derek Bergstrom, Nov 2, 2013.

    Derek Bergstrom Loaded Pockets

    So the ever popular endura got into my pocket as a first spyderco and time and again i have to carry it.
    essentially a larger delica, it shares the same features about it i like with good multi directional handles, lock back, clip, thumb hole, ect.

    [IMG]

    Major con for me is the sabre grind is a bit thick for how thick the blade is in my opinion, and the overall knife in my opinion maybe isnt designed for the hard use the blade design can take, which is why the ffg ones are popular now.


    [IMG]

    Anywho, ive been wanting to try H1 since i heard of it, and i got a pacific salt for 20 bucks used woot! the design is the same to the endura, other than blade steel, hollow ground, point is dropped more, not as grippy pattern, and different clip. so just different enough to have both. both of mine are serrated.

    [IMG]

    Testing ive done is cardboard and plant life. cutting weeds, wood, thistles, briars, roots, leaves, pine needles, grass, ect. other than edc stuff.

    Whittling and cardboard didnt do too bad a number on either one, and the VG10 was designed as a plant grafting scalpel so the grass and stuff didnt kill it right away. With both knives, I found as thick as they were being serrated, stropping back was difficult and if used for too long proved unsuccessful. i use a buffing wheel with green chrome and it can achieve a treetoping edge, especially with dmt serrated sharpeners breathing life into them once theyre too dull to cut paper. with serrations ive never needed them to rip, so i trim mine down a little by grinding on the back of the points of the teeth so theyre not to spikey and long. i can slice paper easily this way. the salt knife has a much stronger lock. splitting some wood was no problem, the endura i am able to force closed with my hands. prolly a lemon.

    I try to leave out overly obvious details everyones said 100 times like h1 doesnt rust, but if they make they reviews more complete let me know and ill add more than just my opinions. trying to keep things short.
    powerring likes this.
    • In Omnia Paratus

    Rattlecan Loaded Pockets

    Just got the ss endura full serrated version... After all my sharpening stuff gets here I will give you a shout. Also, you said that you can force your endura shut with hand....sound like my brothers delica, lol! He couldn't get the thing to lock correctly, so we took it apart and put it back together after not finding the problem.. It works like a normal knife now, prolly just dumb luck! Anyways, interesting stuff here! Take care
    • In Omnia Paratus

    jeepsrjason Loaded Pockets

    Yay H1!:D So which steel did you like better?

    Derek Bergstrom Loaded Pockets

    VG-10, it hasnt rusted on me, and that is the only strength of H1. its not very abrasion resistant and i dont know how the overall strength and toughness is, but it didnt bend or break when being used on wood so that said it may stand up to a more intense session later. i like complex metallurgy insteels,so basically because of all of the fancy schmancy stuff in super steels it has a psychological superiority.
    jeepsrjason likes this.
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    powerring Loaded Pockets

    H-1 is great but I would lean towards using it only in serrated. It's too soft if not edge hardened by the serrations. In a miracle of metallurgy,it goes from holding an edge very poorly in plain edge (58-59 Rc) to being among the best steels I use when serrated (up to an insane 68 Rc, or so I've heard) . For plain edge, I would go for the VG-10. :)

    Note that the H-1 hardens at the edge when serrated but not the rest of the blade which can make it scratch more easily. It has performed as well as I could have asked in the real world.

    Derek Bergstrom Loaded Pockets

    how does one explain a serrated knife being twice as hard as a plain edge? a serrated knife has metal removed to form the serrations, thereby removing what may have been hardened by the edge being compressed by say chopping stone if it does work harden, its not being forged and compressing the structure like brass hardens slightly by doing so, and the plain edge... is also grund away to be sharpened... now if someone tells me nirtogen has some kind of reaction with oxygen and when its scratched it reveals more at the surface and makes a hard shell, like chromium coats steel in such a way, it would also not make sense the blade would scratch more easily than the edge as it has been ground and sanded to be shaped at the factory. i just havnt heard much on this other than psychological what ifs as far as h1 getting harder, and it hasnt been explained or proved as ive searched for how it works so for me im just not a believer.
    Last edited by Derek Bergstrom, Nov 3, 2013

    Derek Bergstrom Loaded Pockets

    yup i just effortlessly scribed the blade flat and the edge of my pacific salt. no difference in harness. zdp delica tip is unscathed.
    powerring likes this.
    • In Omnia Paratus

    powerring Loaded Pockets


    It is hard to believe but below is some info I found on the Spyderco forums a while back. I don't have the original source poster in the first clip but the second quote is from Sal Glesser who founded Spyderco. He's a good guy and I don't see any reason to doubt him, given that it beat some of their more expensive offerings in ZDP-189 and S30V in edge retention tests. :)

    "H1 is a precipitation-hardened alloy. And yes, it is also work-hardened. Meaning that anything that you do that causes heat through friction will harden the steel further; it’s also important to note that tests have shown that it does not become brittle. The work-hardened properties of H1 have been proven by analysis independently performed by Crucible Specialty Metals. It is this that explains why an H1 blade with a SpyderEdge has better edge retention than it's PlainEdge counterpart. In the end, the analysis from Crucible found the Rc at the spine was 58, however at the edge it had increased in both the PlainEdge (to 65 Rc) and the SpyderEdge (to 68 Rc). "

    ---

    "When Dick Barber was working at Crucible, we had discussed the properties of H1 quite a bit. Crucible had micro hardness testing equipment that could be used to test hardness at .001 increments. That's how he tested H1 and that's where the results came from.

    We have been using H1 for a number of years and we're contantly learning more about it's properrties. As a relatively new material, there is little history to work with.

    Some forumites have tested H1 as to it's corrosion resistance quite a bit with positive results.

    CATRA testing on abrasion resistance puts the plain edge in the AUS-8 range. The serrated H1, such as the Jumpmaster, in CATRA tests, have shown to be exceptional with better performance than plain or serrated steels of any that we've tested. Field tests have shown this to be true as well.

    As far as serration shape, this is always challenging. each time a blade is serrated, the formed wheel changes shape a little bit. The wheel is usually dressed every 50 blades or so depending on the blade material. The tendency of most makers is to make them longer and "toothier" to make the wheel last longer between dressing. This is always a challenge as we prefer to dress more often and keep the shape in what we consider to be "ideal". A moving target to be sure.

    If you find your serrations to be too toothy, (any serrations from any company), sharpening on a sharpmaker for a while (several hundred strokes) will usually remedy the situation. We've been making serrated knives since 1982 and we still battle consistent shape.

    sal"

    Derek Bergstrom Loaded Pockets

    thats all really cool and i appreciate you sharing but so far h1 just seems like 420 to me when i use it. i sure as heck like it alot more than the 400 series though. even from the man himself i still think ill have to see it, several times, before believing h1 can be a hard steel. if heat from friction causes is to harden and regular heat doesnt, maybe it has to do with the pressure irritating/exciting/ arranging the molecular structure. DUDE imagine how hard h1 brake rotors would be! so maybe an eraser would be a scratch free way to harden h1? sigh this is so bizzare yet intriguing
    powerring likes this.
    • In Omnia Paratus

    graham_s Loaded Pockets

    I find H-1 is great, but only for speciality applications.
    I have a couple of Atlantic Salts, one serrated, one plain.
    I use the serrated one as a diving knife, I don't even need to rinse it.
    The other I used as a general purpose deck knife when I was surveying offshore.
    Constant immersion in salt water, and no corrosion whatsoever.
    Edge retention wasn't bad either.
    powerring likes this.

    Derek Bergstrom Loaded Pockets

    as ive been cutting more cardboard i think it is staying sharper than when i first got it, ill have to completely dull the edge so bad it isnt a knife anymore on wood and cardboard and then try to scribe it again. stropping brings it back a lot too